Introduction

Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), the most common type of dementia, is one of the most feared and devastating conditions associated with old age. This course will provide an update of the rapidly accumulating knowledge of this field, highlighting what clinicians need to know about diagnosis, current standards of treatment, and the future of Alzheimer’s care. Through a case study, course participants will become aware of the early presentation and course of the illness, and of the need to identify and treat potentially reversible contributions to cognitive decline. We will emphasize the ways in which AD leads to progressive impairments in a patient’s cognition and behavior that can profoundly alter one’s interpersonal relationships and daily activities. Currently approved treatments for AD that aim to ameliorate cognitive and behavioral symptoms will be reviewed. Finally, we will address the underlying pathophysiology of AD that will allow course participants to have a greater understanding of the disease-modifying treatments that currently are being developed.

Meet The Author

Diler Acar

Diler Acar

Dr. Acar is a graduate of Istanbul University. She subsequently served as Clinical Research Associate Department of Dermatology at Yale University; Clinical Research Associate Behavioral Neurology Unit at Beth Israel Hospital, Harvard Medical School; Internship in Medicine at Carney Hospital Boston University School of Medicine; Neurology Resident New England Medical Center Tufts University; Chief Neurology Resident New England Medical Center Tufts University; Fellow in Behavioral Neurology Brigham & Women’s Hospital Harvard Medical School; Consulting Neurologist McLean Hospital; Instructor in Neurology Harvard Medical School; Associate Neurologist Brigham & Women’s Hospital; Staff Neurologist Newton-Wellesley Hospital; Attending Neurologist Newton-Wellesley Hospital, and Teaching Neurologist, Behavioral Neurology Unit Brigham and Women’s Hospital Rotating Resident.

Kirk R. Daffner

Kirk R. Daffner

Dr. Daffner is founder and chief of the Division of Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology at the Brigham and Women's Hospital. Under his leadership, the division has become a nationally recognized center of excellence in patient care, teaching, and research within the field of behavioral neurology and dementia. The division consists of neurologists, neuropsychiatrists, neuropsychologists, social workers and rehabilitation specialists. This multidisciplinary approach helps to ensure that patients are accurately diagnosed and are offered the most comprehensive treatment strategies available. The division has fostered the growth of several related clinical research laboratories in ERPs, fMRI, and neuropsychology that are investigating memory, attention, and executive functioning in aging and dementia. They have developed a state-of-the-art Clinical Trials Center that supports National Institutes of Health-sponsored, industry-sponsored, and investigator-initiated translational research of dementia. Dr. Daffner is a graduate of Harvard College and of Harvard Medical School, where he is an associate professor of neurology. He has published extensively on the neurological underpinnings of executive functions, on factors that may contribute to successful cognitive aging, and on the early diagnosis of AD.

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